Read Abiding Places, Korea South & North by Ko Un Free Online


Ebook Abiding Places, Korea South & North by Ko Un read! Book Title: Abiding Places, Korea South & North
The author of the book: Ko Un
Edition: Tupelo Press
Date of issue: October 1st 2006
Format files: PDF
The size of the: 934 KB
City - Country: No data
Loaded: 2463 times
Reader ratings: 5.5
ISBN: 1932195408
ISBN 13: 9781932195408
Language: English

Read full description of the books:



Poetry. Translated from the Korean. In ABIDING PLACES, Korean poet Ko Un transfigures his homeland in lovely, observant, and penetrating poems uniting ancient and modern, secular and spiritual, art and politics, North and South. When his former political cellmate Kim Dae-Jung became president of South Korea in 1998, Ko Un became the first citizen from the South to be invited to tour the North. From that visit came this deceptively simple and deeply engaging book. Ko Un is Korea's most prolific living writer. He has published fifteen volumes of poetry and has twice won the prestigious Korean Literature Prize.


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Read information about the author

Ebook Abiding Places, Korea South & North read Online! Ko was born Ko Untae in Gunsan, North Jeolla Province in 1933. He was at Gunsan Middle School when war broke out.
The Korean War emotionally and physically traumatized Ko and caused the death of many of his relatives and friends. Ko's hearing suffered from acid that he poured into his ears during an acute crisis in this time and it was further harmed by a police beating in 1979. In 1952, before the war had ended, Ko became a Buddhist monk. After a decade of monastic life, he chose to return to the active, secular world in 1962 to become a devoted poet. From 1963 to 1966 he lived on Jejudo, where he set up a charity school, and then moved back to Seoul. His life was not calm in the outer world, and he wound up attempting suicide (a second time) in 1970.
Around the time the South Korean government attempted to curb democracy by putting forward the Yusin Constitution in late 1972, Ko became very active in the democracy movement and led efforts to improve the political situation in South Korea, while still writing prolifically and being sent to prison four times (1974, 1979, 1980 and 1989). In May 1980, during the coup d'etat led by Chun Doo-hwan, Ko was accused of treason and sentenced to 20 years' imprisonment. He was released in August 1982 as part of a general pardon.
After his release, his life became calmer; however, he startled his large following by revising many of his previously published poems. Ko married Sang-Wha Lee on May 5, 1983, and moved to Anseong, Gyeonggi-do, where he still lives. He resumed writing and began to travel, his many visits providing fabric for the tapestry of his poems. Since 2007, he is a visiting scholar in Seoul National University, and teaches poetics and literature.


Reviews of the Abiding Places, Korea South & North


OWEN

This book is awesome!

LUCA

I read the whole book with a stupid smile on my face. General advice to everyone!

FREYA

Fantastic book!

EDWARD

An interesting book, Hard to tear down

AMY

Rarely do the books make me cry, but this one could.




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